Wildflowers and Plants

The true beauty of the San Joaquin valley can be observed in the spring following a rainy winter season. Rolling hills become saturated with gleaming hues that graze the powder blue horizon. One of the earliest European advocates of California wildlife conservations, John Muir, had explored these valleys in the months of April and May during his time. His description of the vast quantity of wildflowers was that “one foot would press about one hundred”. Such quantities of growth are ideal for the avid or novice natural beauty admirer, however they are not achieved every spring (Bureau of Land Management, 2016).

Temperatures in the month of march vary in the 60’s and 70’s but we can never plan for any amount of rainfall. When the rains grace the southlands wildflowers are sure to grow in more abundance in the later months of april and may. Without abounding cascading droplets of life, peak wildflower season is expected during March. In the foothills, goldenbrush shrub begin to bloom, gleaming with bright yellow petals. The supple purple of the bush lupin will bless the scenery along with pale yellows of the astragalus or loco weed. Depending on the year, california poppies will litter the landscape with plump orange petals (Bureau of Land Management, 2016).

Wildflowers
Under ideal circumstances, the Carrizo Plains wildflower growth would be similar to the following artists rendition, by Frank Kee.

Plant List; Provided by Bureau of Land Management, Bakersfield Office

https://www.inaturalist.org/check_lists/8853-BLM-Carrizo-Plant-List